An Afternoon at Erddig

An Afternoon at Erddig

With the sun finally shining on Friday, I was raring to go and a visit to Erddig was top of the list. Halfway to our destination, I realised I had not changed the lens on my camera (my macro lens was attached) and so I would have to use my mobile phone for the majority of the photos (my Huawei P30 Pro came to the rescue!).

Erddig
Erddig

Erddig is a National Trust property a short distance from Wrexham in North East Wales. The main part of the hall was built in the 17th century, with 2 wings added in the 1720’s. In 1733 the property was bequeathed to the Yorke family and it was passed down the generations until 240 years later when Philip Scott Yorke, the last squire of Erddig, gave it to the National Trust in March 1973.

The Dovecote at Erddig.
The Dovecote at Erddig.

Several years earlier a shaft from the nearby Bersham Colliery had collapsed under the house and work was needed to save the house from becoming a ruin. Compensation from the National Coal Board paid for the underpinning of the house and the sale of 63 acres of parkland paid for restoration work on the house. In the summer of 1977, the house was officially opened to the public (by Prince Charles, no less) and the house and the 1,200 acres of parkland remain open to the public to this day.

We began our visit with lunch at Erddig’s Hayloft restaurant where hot food, salads, sandwiches, cakes and drinks are available. I settled for a chicken & vegetable salad, whilst Mum chose an egg sandwich. We both grabbed a bag of crisps each and a drink. Looking around us at the restaurant (I love to people-watch) showed the variety of people visiting Erddig – young families, friends, couples, older people. It’s obviously a place for everyone to visit for a day out. The gift shop is situated just below the Hayloft restaurant, but we left that for later.

The donkeys at Erddig.
The donkeys at Erddig.
A 1907 Rover - Erddig's first car.
A 1907 Rover – Erddig’s first car.

Having looked around The Outer Yard, we said hello to the donkeys and the horses in the Stableyard. In the carriage house, there is a collection of old bicycles and cars, many of which look like they are in need of restoration (not that I’d want to ride any of them in the cobbled Stableyard!).

The kitchen at Erddig.
The kitchen at Erddig.
 A glazed ceramic water filter marked with 'Cheavin's 'Saludor (Safe Water) Filter. Drinking water of absolute purity. British Made throughout'.
A glazed ceramic water filter marked with ‘Cheavin’s ‘Saludor (Safe Water) Filter. Drinking water of absolute purity. British Made throughout’.
A wicker basket of bottles.
A wicker basket of bottles.

We entered the house itself via the Dairy and the lower ground floor of the house, making our way through the servants’ working areas of the house (“below stairs”) and up through the state rooms (“above stairs”). I think you could visit Erddig and still not take it all in. There is so much within the house itself to see. Not all the rooms are accessible, but there is still so much to see. There is so much history in this house and the volunteers are very knowledgeable.

The Dining Room (originally the Best Bedchamber).
The Dining Room (originally the Best Bedchamber).
The Library.
The Library.
Mechanical musical players in the Music Room (also known as The Entrance Hall).
Mechanical musical players in the Music Room (also known as The Entrance Hall).
The Chapel (at the far end of the north wing).
The Chapel (at the far end of the north wing).

The gardens spread out behind Erddig Hall and there is plenty to see. Bees dart around the garden from flower to flower, squirrels dash through the grass and up the trees, and a heron sits next to the canal, patiently waiting to catch its prey. There are plenty of places to sit and take in the beautiful surroundings.

In the gardens at Erddig.
In the gardens at Erddig.
A pool at Erddig.
A pool at Erddig.
The Canal at Erddig.
The Canal at Erddig.

For those wishing to stretch their legs a bit more, there are long walks through Erddig’s wonderful parkland. We sadly didn’t get time to take in any of the walks, but that just means we’ll have to make a return trip one day!

A beautiful place to sit.
A beautiful place to sit.
A peaceful place to sit.
A peaceful place to sit.
Beautiful plants.
Beautiful plants.
Beehives at Erddig.
Beehives at Erddig.

Before heading home, we made sure to visit the gift shop. Pen friends of mine will know I’m partial to their beautiful notecards and I was also very nearly tempted by a few of their plants.

A greenhouse at Erddig.
A greenhouse at Erddig.
A bee on Veronica 'Inspire Blue'.
A bee on Veronica ‘Inspire Blue’.

A bee collecting pollen.

A bee on a pink flower.

A bee on a yellow daisy.

It’s impossible to see everything at Erddig in one day and so very much warrants a return trip. Those with accessibility needs will be pleased to hear that the gardens are on flat ground, though the cobbled yards might cause a slight issue for wheelchair users (hold on to your teeth!).

We paid £13.50 each for entry to the house & gardens (entry to just the summer gardens & outhouses is £8.60 for adults) and I thought it was well worth the money as there was so much to see. I’m already looking forward to a return visit.

Farewell by welcome here again.

14 comments

  1. Jo says:

    It looks like you had a wonderful day out. I must admit that I usually enjoy looking around the rooms below stairs more than above, I find this area in grand houses fascinating.

  2. Lisa says:

    What a lovely day out in a very special place. I love the look of those mechanical music players, it reminds me of the music box that Flora used to have as a toddler but these are far more sophisticated! And those donkeys are so cute 🙂 Gorgeous photos, thank you for sharing! Lisa

  3. Hi Nikki,

    We are NT members, however we do sometimes comment on what appears to be the very high cost of admission to some of their properties. With all those grounds and walks as well as the amazing house, Erddig looks like good value for money.

    We have often passed through, or near to Wrexham, when we travel to Llandudno to visit our friends, so I just don’t know how we have managed to miss this property as somewhere to stop off, either on our way there, or on the journey home.

    The walled gardens look amazing and like yourself, I am addicted to notepads and stationery, so I have to try and avoid the shop at all costs, although neither of us can ever walk past the tearooms or restaurant without sampling a slice of locally made cake!

    Great pictures, thanks for sharing 🙂

    Yvonne
    xx

  4. Kelly says:

    This is a good example of what great photos one can take with a cellphone! I can see how this would be a great place for multiple visits. Since we’re really into bees and hives at our house these days, I’m fascinated by photos of the hives you shared.

  5. CherryPie says:

    I love visiting Erddig and on one of my visits I saw a mole scuttling across the ground nowhere near his hole in the ground. WOW what a fantastic experience!

    My hubby finds the place rather sad due to its history making him reluctant to return. I would love to explore the grounds further.

  6. What a cool place to visit. Love that kitchen. HAHA course I would never cook enough to use that set up. The flowers are amazing, beautiful color. Thanks for sharing the tour with us. I really enjoyed it.

  7. Oops….meant to also tell you that I noticed you are from Wales. A place I would love to visit one day cause according to my dad’s history that is where the Montgomery’s came from. Thanks for sharing the cool pics.

  8. Bexa says:

    What a wonderful day out, Nikki! So interesting and your photos are so gorgeous too! The close ups with the bees on flowers are incredible, you always capture such stunning shots! Thank you for sharing and glad you had a great time! <3 xx

    Bexa | http://www.hellobexa.com

  9. Anca says:

    I haven’t been to Erddig in a long time. The photos look amazing. Huawei makes fab pictures. My husband has one and we use his phone for pictures instead of taking the DSLR with us everywhere.

  10. Angie says:

    Nikki – a classic home and garden – just the type of place I thrill to visit when I am in the UK. Thanks for sharing – brought back many a pleasant memory!

  11. Helen says:

    That looks like a nice place to visit, it’s a shame your ticket wasn’t a free return within the year 🙂 Loved the lavender and donkey pic’s, your phone takes better photos than my camera

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